Cities

Oslo

– the capital and largest city of Norway, with museums of national importance, a beautiful setting and lively nightlife and cultural scene.

Bergen

– Once the capital of Norway, old Hanseatic trading centre with a rich culture and dramatic scenery, Norway's second largest city. Wonderfully cute wooden buildings, a magnificent mountain setting, varied nightlife and lots of atmosphere. This is your gateway to the western fjords. The city has been dubbed "the rainiest city in Europe" with an average of 250 days of rainfall a year. Bring an umbrella.

Bodø

– The gateway to the magnificent Lofoten islands. And the place of Saltstraumen, the worlds strongest maelstrom.

Drammen

– Once known as industrial and grimy, but refurbishment has made Drammen an enjoyable side trip from Oslo.

Fredrikstad

– A magnificent old town stands out from the rest of the rather nondescript city. Brilliant as a day trip from Oslo.

Kristiansand

– The jolly capital of the South. Best known for the family attraction Kristiansand zoo and amusement park and as Norway's "cool riviera".

Stavanger

– The fourth largest city, and the third largest urban area. Commercially important due to the oil business. The wooden, cobbled central area is one of the most charming places in Norway. Home to one of Norway's medieval churches, you can also visit Iron Age homes, stone age caves, and sites where the Viking kings used to meet at Ullandhaugtårnet. Stavanger is where Erik the Red was born.

Tromsø

– A magnificent, modern cathedral and absolutely no polar bears roaming the streets.

Trondheim

– Famous for its stunning cathedral (Nidarosdomen). Wonderful riverside wharfs, wooden buildings and the best student nightlife in Norway give beautiful, leafy Trondheim its charm.

Other destinations

Atlanterhavsveien

– The Atlantic Ocean Road is a spectacular road with bridges along islands and skerries on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean.

Hardangervidda

– Norway's largest national park on a large highland plateau.

Jostedalsbreen

– The largest glacier on the European mainland.

Jotunheimen

– A majestic landscape and home of Norway's highest mountains.

Lofoten

– Experience the midnight sun in this traditional fishing district in the northern province with islands and mountains.

Nordkapp

– This cliff is the northernmost point of continental Europe, overlooking the Barents ocean.

Sognefjorden

– Glaciers, mountains and picturesque settlements are but a few of the sights on the Sognefjord. Flåm and Nærøyfjorden (also a UNESCO World Heritage site) are parts of the mighty Sognefjorden system.

Sights

Geirangerfjord

fjord in Norway

Nordkapp

municipality in Finnmark, Norway

Lofoten

archipelago and traditional district in Nordland county, Norway

Jostedal Glacier

largest glacier in continental Europe

Jotunheimen

mountain range

Stryn

municipality in the Sogn og Fjordane, Norway

Hellesylt

village in Norway

Romsdal

valley in Norway

Ryfylke

district of Norway

Sognefjord

fjord in Norway

Hardanger

district

Gudbrandsdalen

valley and traditional district in the Norwegian county of Oppland

Valdres

traditional district and valley in Oppland county, between Gudbrandsdal and Hallingdal, in Norway

Troms

county of Norway

Telemark

county of Norway

Western Norway

region of Norway

Stavanger

city and municipality in Rogaland, Norway

Molde

municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Geiranger

human settlement

Nærøy

municipality in Trøndelag, Norway

Nordland

county of Norway

Bodø

city and municipality in Nordland, Norway

Central Norway

Steinkjer

municipality in Trøndelag, Norway

Eastern Norway

region of Norway

Finnmark

county of Norway

Tromsø

municipality in Troms, Norway

Oslo

capital city and county in Norway

Røros

municipality in Trøndelag, Norway

Ålesund

municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Levanger

municipality in Trøndelag, Norway

Lillehammer

municipality in Oppland county, Norway

Lillesand

municipality in Aust-Agder, Norway

Risør

Municipality in Norway

Kristiansand

city, municipality and the county capital of Vest-Agder county in Southern Norway

Flekkefjord

municipality in Vest-Agder, Norway

Lærdal

municipality in Sogn og Fjordane, Norway

Drøbak

city in Norway

Flåm Line

railway line

Trysil

municipality in Hedmark, Norway

Hafjell

ski resort in Norway

Hemsedal

municipality in Buskerud, Norway

Alps

major mountain range system in Central Europe

Galdhøpiggen

mountain in Lom, Oppland, Norway

Folgefonna

glacier

Kvitfjell

ski resort

Voss

Norwegian municipality

Stranda

municipality in Møre og Romsdal, Norway

Oppdal

municipality in Trøndelag, Norway

Geilo

city

Lyngen

municipality in Troms, Norway

Odda

municipality in Hordaland, Norway

Narvik

city in Nordland, Norway

Rauland

Sogndal

municipality in Sogn og Fjordane, Norway

Røldal

human settlement

Sylte, Norddal

village in and the centre of Norddal municipality

Hell, Norway

village in Stjørdalen, Norway

Alta, Norway

municipality in Finnmark, Norway

Luster, Norway

municipality in Sogn og Fjordane, Norway

Someday

guide to

Norway

Norway (Norwegian: Norge or Noreg) is the westernmost, northernmost — and surprisingly also the easternmost — of the three Scandinavian countries. Norway is known for the complex and deep fjords along its west coast, as well as the midnight sun and Northern Lights. Mainland Norway stretches from the North Sea near Denmark and Scotland to borders with northern Finland and the northwestern tip of Russia, and has a long border with Sweden to the east. Norway also includes the Svalbard islands in the Arctic.

Arriving

Entry requirements

Norway is a member of the Schengen Agreement.

Russians who live within 30km from the border may enter Norway visa-free for up to 15 days, provided they have been resident in the border area for at least 3 years, and do not travel more than 30km from the border. A border certificate, which is valid for multiple entries, must be obtained from the Norwegian consulate in Murmansk in advance.

Citizens of Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Japan, Macedonia*, Malaysia, Mexico, Monaco, Montenegro*, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, San Marino, Singapore, South Korea, United States, Uruguay, Vatican City, Venezuela, as well as holders of Hong Kong SAR or Macau SAR passports are permitted to work in Norway without the need to obtain a visa or any further authorisation for the period of their 90 day visa-free stay. However, this ability to work visa-free does not necessarily extend to other Schengen countries.

Be keenly aware that Norway is not a member of the European Union. This means, especially if arriving by plane, that all persons entering Norway, regardless of point of origin, may be subject to customs controls at the port of entry. Information on duty-free allowances and regulations can be found on the Norwegian Customs website.

While Svalbard has no border controls, most regular flights depart from Norway, so foreign visitors need to clear Norwegian immigration control.

Oslo

Oslo Airport, Gardermoen (OSL IATA) is the biggest airport in Norway and the main international hub, at Gardermoen 60 km (37 mi) north of Oslo. The airport is served by many major international and most domestic airlines.

The airport has scheduled flights to around 100 destinations abroad and 24 domestic destinations in Norway.

From the United Kingdom there are direct services to Oslo Gardermoen from:

From Ireland:

From the United States:

From Australia and New Zealand, the quickest connection is via Bangkok, Doha or Dubai. Thai Airways and Norwegian Air Shuttle fly non-stop from Oslo to Bangkok. Both Qatar Airways and Emirates fly daily from Doha and Dubai respectively, with connections from several destinations in Asia and Oceania.

Sandefjord

Sandefjord Airport, Torp (TRF IATA) is located just north of Sandefjord, 115 km to the south of Oslo.

Sandefjord Airport Torp has scheduled flights to various destinations in Europe and in Norway.

Stavanger

Stavanger Airport, Sola (SVG IATA) has scheduled flights to/from London, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Frankfurt, Berlin, Paris, Kraków, Madrid, Nice and some other European cities.

From the United Kingdom there are direct flights from:

Bergen

Bergen Airport, Flesland (BGO IATA) has scheduled flights to/from major European cities as London, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, Berlin, Paris, Stockholm, Prague, Warsaw and other cities.

Apart from to previously mentioned airports there are domestic flights to Trondheim and Tromsø.

From the United Kingdom there are direct flights from:


From the United States there are seasonal direct flights from:

Kristiansand

Kristiansand Airport, Kjevik (KRS IATA) has direct flights to/from major European cities, notably Amsterdam, London and Copenhagen.

Trondheim

Trondheim Airport, Værnes (TRD IATA) can be reached by direct flights from several European cities, notably Amsterdam, London and Copenhagen.

Tromsø

Tromsø Airport (TOS IATA) has direct flights from London Gatwick with Norwegian Air Shuttle twice a week.

By train

There are trains from Sweden to Oslo, Trondheim and Narvik, with onwards inland connections.

For Oslo, daily service from Stockholm and Gothenburg. There are local services from Karlstad as well.

For Trondheim, the Nabotåget service from Östersund corresponds with one day and one night service from Stockholm, as well as the train from Sundsvall.

For Narvik, two trains run daily from Stockholm via Kiruna. Both are overnight.

Train schedules can be found on the website of the Norwegian State Railways and the Swedish Railways.

By bus

Several international bus lines run into Oslo from Sweden, the major operators being Eurolines, Swebus Express and Säfflebussen. Service to Gothenburg and Copenhagen is almost hourly. The service to Stockholm is also far more frequent than the train. Lavprisekspressen has cheap bus tickets between the large cities in Norway, Denmark and Sweden.

The minibus service between Kirkenes and Murmansk run three times per day. Contact Grenseland/Sovjetreiser (yes, they are actually still called that!) in Kirkenes for booking.

Other coach lines exist between Sweden and Bodø and Mo i Rana, as well as between Denmark and Stavanger.

By car

It is possible to enter by road from Sweden, Finland, or Russia. Major roads to Norway include European route E6 which runs through Malmö, Helsingborg and Göteborg in Sweden before crossing the border at Svinesund in the south-east of Norway, E8 which runs through Turku, Vaasa and Oulu in Finland before crossing the border at Kilpisjärvi. There is an enormous number of possible routes and border crossings, but keep in mind that the road standards vary, there are few motorways and that speed limits are low (generally 80km/h). Ferries from Denmark and Kiel (Germany) also takes cars (see boat section), and is a way to avoid long transport legs.

From Russia: European route 105 (E105) enters from Russia at Storskog border crossing 15 km east of Kirkenes. This is the only overland crossing between Norway and Russia. Crossing by vehicle (also bike) only, no pedestrians (as of 2015). Most people need a visa to cross.

From Belgium

DFDS operates a cargo line from Ghent to Brevik with limited passenger capacity which is normally for truck drivers. There are departures once or twice a week.The ferry may be scheduled to arrive at Brevik in the middle of the night.

From Germany

Color Line runs a daily ferry from Kiel to Oslo. The ferry leaves Kiel at 13:30 and arrives in Oslo at 09:30, the following day. The ferry terminal in Kiel is on Norwegenkai, which is a short walk across the bridge from Kiel's main railway station (the bridge may at times be closed for pedestrians due to ship traffic). At the Oslo end of the journey, the terminal is located at Hjortneskai, which is just west of the city. There is a bus from the terminal to the city centre, which departs shortly after passengers disembark.

From England

There are no ferry routes to the UK from Norway any more, although DFDS Seaways have been to known to allow passengers on their freight service from Immingham to Brevik.

Thomson Cruise ships operate from Harwich and visit Flåm, Bergen, Molde, Hammerfest, Nordkapp, Tromsø, Lofoten Islands, Geiranger and Ålesund in Norway. The duration of the cruise varies from 5 days up to 2 weeks. Sailing time from Harwich to south Norway is 1.5 days. The cruise ship has restaurants, bars, casinos, cinemas and also a stage show to keep you entertained during the journey. Various classes of cabins are available, ranging from shared rooms to singles, doubles and luxury suites.

From Shetland, Faeroe Islands and Iceland

Smyril Line used to operate a once-weekly service to Bergen. This service now only operates Denmark-Shetland-Faroe Islands-Iceland.

Tipping

Traditionally, the tip has not been common, but is being introduced by outside influence. Tipping should be given only as a token of real appreciation for the service. In Norway, like most of Europe, waiters are not dependent on tips from customers as they are in the US, as they are well paid. However, tipping is not unusual in mid- to high-end cafés and restaurants, but only if you feel you have been treated well. In restaurants, even though there is a service fee, rounding up is the norm, and 10% is considered generous. It is not normal to tip outside restaurants and bars, but in situations where change is common it is polite to leave the change (for example, taxis). Tipping cab drivers is usual if you travel for more than 200 kr, but you will get no reaction from the driver should you choose not to tip, so this may be a new experience to American and English tourists. Tipping is never considered offensive, but not tipping is also rarely frowned upon.

More information available on Wikivoyage

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